Why I Love Hockey Camp

Coach Chris Hall

I’ll admit it. I’m a hockey camp junkie. I could do hockey camps every summer for the rest of my life. I’m a big believer in the value of hockey camps and what they bring to the table for a young person no matter what age.

Camps force players outside of their comfort zones. They have to interact with and play with people they have met mere minutes before. They have to become comfortable in a new environment, in a new location and with new coaches. They are given an opportunity to learn from different coaches and leaders – they are exposed to ideas and concepts they may have never seen before. Players are given a first hand look at just where they fit in the pecking order.

As a coach, I love the opportunity that camps present. I love to teach the game of hockey and there is no…

View original post 170 more words

Advertisements

What to look for to determine IF you need your skates profiled.

Blog 3This is quite straight forward. If the shape of your blade looks like a banana—with no working radius—you need to get them profiled; if you buy new skates, you need to get them profiled; if you are slipping on turns and cannot generate your usual speed, you need to get them profiled; if you find it difficult to make quick stops and starts, you need to get them profiled. Snipers Skate Shop has the best skate profiling system. Only  $20.

Why you need to get your skates profiled or rockered.

snipersskate

bauerHi, Again. It has been awhile since I posted anything new, but I have been very busy with other events and responsibilities, lately.

So, why is it important to have your skates profiled or “re-rockered”? Over time, the contour or shape of your skate blade runner will become altered. The reason for this is generally due to the number of sharpenings you receive every year and the technique of the skate technician. After a certain number of skate sharpenings ( sometimes your skate blade runner will be altered after one sharpening if the person sharpening them is not doing it properly), you should check how much of the blade is in contact with the ice. I do this with a flat surface such as the top of my sharpening machine and a flashlight. By shining the light against the bottom of the blade, I can get a fair and…

View original post 276 more words

Why you need to get your skates profiled or rockered.

bauerHi, Again. It has been awhile since I posted anything new, but I have been very busy with other events and responsibilities, lately.

So, why is it important to have your skates profiled or “re-rockered”? Over time, the contour or shape of your skate blade runner will become altered. The reason for this is generally due to the number of sharpenings you receive every year and the technique of the skate technician. After a certain number of skate sharpenings ( sometimes your skate blade runner will be altered after one sharpening if the person sharpening them is not doing it properly), you should check how much of the blade is in contact with the ice. I do this with a flat surface such as the top of my sharpening machine and a flashlight. By shining the light against the bottom of the blade, I can get a fair and accurate picture of the amount of blade surface: an 11 foot radius will have about 2 inches on the ice, a 9 foot or 9/10 will have 1 and 3/4 inches.

Most skate manufacturers will have a standard radius or stock radius ground on their skates eg. Bauer generally has a 9 foot, CCM/RBK 10/11 or 11 foot, and Graf an 11 foot. It is important to tell your profiler just what you are looking for when it comes to your performance. If you are a forward, you want agility and manuveurability and would want a 9 or 9/10 contour/profile and if you want more speed, you would select an 11 or 13 foot; goalies have most of their blade on the ice and typically go with a 28 foot or 30 foot radius. My second cousin, Devan Dubnyk—who played for the Edmonton Oilers—has a big foot/skate and has a 100mm/200mm profile on his blades, or almost the entire blade surface in contact with the ice. There are literally dozens of custom profiles to choose from. Go to a reputable ProShop—mine would be nice—to get them done. (Hint: David Carlson/Karlsson has more than 10 years experience.)

Young Players who are just starting to skate should have as much blade on the ice as possible; about 2 inches would be optimal to ensure more stability. Forget about expecting your young beginner to stop and start or dangle or weave through traffic; they will learn those skills later on in their playing days.

I hope this was helpful and if you have an comments, questions, hints of your own, please free to include them on my Snipers Facebook Page or on twitter @snipersskate. Thank you.

One last thing, you may want to look at some of the Sporting Goods on my friend, Warren Nye’s excellent site:  http://ultimatehockeysource.com

Earn the Right to Win – Tom Coughlin

Coach Chris Hall

Over the weekend I finished “Earn the Right to Win” by Tom Coughlin. A quick and smooth read and one I would recommend to anyone. In fact, it is one that I will be re-reading (either just chapters or the whole thing) when I need a refresher on what it takes to build a successful organization.

Coughlin has coached in the NCAA and the NFL – including stops at BC, Jacksonville and most recently the NY Giants. He has found success in every stop along the way and learned a lot about himself and what it means to be a successful coach. He includes anecdotes from each of his experiences and how he came to learn and realize the things that have made him successful.

He lays out his roadmap to success in six well-written chapters:

  • Build the Structure
  • The Time of Your Life: Scheduling
  • Success Is in the Details

View original post 94 more words